Less is More

We may become overwhelmed by our family responsibilities and job expectations. Recall the adage that less is more, and prioritise your main role, in which you cannot be replaced.

“You can’t have it all,” used to be a saying to describe women juggling careers and motherhood. Mothers are caught in the conundrum of trying to be present for their children while having a successful career, all at the same time. It is very hard.

Anne Marie Slaughter, a Princeton University Professor, who got her dream job in the government in Washington DC, realised she could not “have it all”.

So she wrote an article called, “Why Women Still Can’t Have It All”. Anne Marie’s article is searingly honest and revealing. Her video interview about her story is also very good.

It is not just women who can’t have it all. Dads are the same. We have to make a decision on what we are going to have, and what we are not going to have, and sometimes less is more.

Harmony

Jason from Dad University gives us some great insight into the need, not for Work-Life Balance, but Work-Life harmony.

My son’s wife is struggling with recovery from post-natal depression.

Twelve months ago she was going really well, but when she had a relapse, my son had to make some adjustments in his priorities, because less is more.

My son is an engineer, and his company is very family-friendly. They allowed him to start late every day so he can run his children to school and in exchange, he loses his rostered day off. He can’t go surfing that day, but less is more, and better still, his wife is happier and getting better by the day.

Gary Vaynerchuk is a very successful businessman who gives some very good tips about work-life harmony here:

Recently, I came across the Australian Fatherhood Research Consortium and its monthly newsletter. In it, I found a great article called “Take it easy on yourself, Dad” by a father with a young baby juggling the challenge of being a father and successful in his work.

“As I write this, my little nine-month-old boy Jack is sound asleep, something that has been a rare occurrence in our household up until recently. I had been told by everyone to be prepared for the lack of sleep a baby brings to your life, however, being a shift worker gave me a sense of false confidence and I thought I would cruise through these sleepless nights with ease.

I was wrong! I was working 12hr days, studying, trying to be a good husband and father and it was slowly wearing me down. I found myself feeling really low and disappointed as I had a feeling, I wasn’t being the father I had imagined myself to be.

Even though our wives and partners often bear most of the workload with raising children, I felt a lot of pressure as a dad to be this superhero-type figure that doesn’t waver under pressure and will always be a solid rock that the family can rely on. 

My wife is amazing and seems to have an endless abundance of energy. She has handled the sleepless nights much better than I. It took some honest conversations with her and a hard look at myself to realise I was running myself into the ground. This was counterproductive to being a good father.

It was then that I made the decision to take a step back from some of the areas of my life that were adding pressure and direct more of my focus to being present with my son. That small change had a huge positive effect for myself and my family. I have realised through having our son that I can’t do everything all at once and it is ok to ask for help, take a step back and sometimes less is more.

I have found success in parenting my son through not being so hard on myself and trying every day to just enjoy the little moments I get with him. I can be the rock my wife and son need, but I’m only capable of being that if I don’t take on too much work and added pressure. 

After all, my first and most important job is being a father.”

Lovework

You cannot have it all. Something has to take precedence. The key thing is to work out what is important to you as a father, and as a man with a vocation, because less is more.

Yours for the Important Things,
Warwick Marsh

PS: A massive thank you to all those who donated to our end-of-year Dads4Kids matching challenge. The stupendous news is: we met the target! The really good news is that your giving is going to enable us to help many more dads be better dads and put a smile on many more children’s faces.

Together we are making a difference! You can still donate today if you want to. Just that you will have to wait for a while for a tax deduction. Donate here!

___

First published at Dads4Kids. Photo by Kampus Production.

Thank the Source

Smoking gun evidence: John Barilaro’s mistress Jennifer Lugsdin worked at Investment NSW at the time Barilaro stole the $500,000 New York job

John Barilaro’s last shreds of credibility have been destroyed this week with evidence given at the NSW Parliament inquiry but what has been overlooked so far is what role his mistress Jennifer Lugsdin played and what benefits she received. Barilaro has resigned from the $500,000 New York job position but there are still at least 4 inquiries, 2 government and 2 NSW ICAC, that are still afoot and below is relevant evidence that all the media are refusing to report, so I will.

This article is a follow-up from last week’s article: “John Barilaro’s fraud, theft and sexual affairs likely to take down NSW Premier Dominic Perrottet” which starts off “John Barilaro’s dodgy appointment to a $500,000 NSW Government job in New York will face an NSW Parliament Upper House inquiry on Wednesday next week (29/6/22) but the media are failing to report some key facts of corruption.” (Click here to read the article)

Jennifer Lugsdin worked directly for John Barilaro for 2 years then moved to Investment NSW for 5 months from August 2021 until December 2021 when her affair with John Barilaro was exposed in the media and she left immediately. Below is a screenshot of her LinkedIn page:

A few questions:

  1. When Jennifer Lugsdin worked at Investment NSW, which is the department that gave John Barilaro the $500,000 New York job, from August 2021 to December 2021 did she help or communicate with John Barilaro regarding the New York role?
  2. How did Jennifer Lugsdin get her role at Investment NSW and was anyone there aware that she was John Barilaro’s mistress? Who in the government was aware that it was blatant corruption for Jennifer Lugsdin to take the role given she was in a relationship with John Barilaro?
  3. Was Jennifer Lugsdin going to benefit financially if John Barilaro had gone to New York? E.g. Would she have gone with Barilaro and would she have been employed by Barilaro, on the government’s payroll, in the New York office?

Below is the article from December 2021 that outed Jennifer Lugsdin as John Barilaro’s “new partner” and she left her Senior Media Advisor role at Investment NSW. Who knew what and when? That is a question Investment NSW CEO Amy Brown should have been asked when she gave evidence on Wednesday (29/6/22) at the NSW Parliament inquiry.

Below is the video I published on Friday (1/7/22) about this matter which also has video of John Barilaro ducking and weaving at NSW ICAC about his “intimate personal relationships”. The video also adds other relevant information to this article:

NSW Parliament inquiry

The NSW Parliament held a public hearing on Wednesday which was the first day of their continuing investigation into John Barilaro’s appointment to the $500,000 job. Barilaro was smashed in all the media, especially social media, as it was revealed by the only witness, Investment NSW CEO Amy Brown, that Barilaro had set up the job and withdrawn the job offer from the candidate who had been offered the role. And then Amy Brown offered Barilaro the job after another “independent recruitment process”.

After Amy Brown’s performance giving evidence under oath, the stenches of corruption could be smelt around the globe and social media unloaded. I posted the below two messages on Twitter as well as others:

(Click here to see on Twitter)

(Click here to see on Twitter) (Click here to see the Eternity News article interview with Amy Brown)

The NSW Parliament inquiry resumes next week and is quite broad as it says on their website “This inquiry was self-referred on 23 June 2022 to inquire into and report on the appointment of Mr John Barilaro as Senior Trade and Investment Commissioner to the Americas and any other related matter.” (Click here to see it on the government website)

I have no doubt that Jennifer Lugsdin’s relationship with John Barilaro would be covered by “any other related matter”. So, how about you the readers click on the link here and email the MP’s overseeing the inquiring asking that they look into the John Barilaro / Jennifer Lugsdin relationship to see if any corruption happened.

Please use Twitter, Facebook, email and the other buttons below and help promote this article.  

Kangaroo Court of Australia is an independent website and is reliant on donations to keep publishing. If you would like to support the continuance of this website, please click on the button below to donate via PayPal or go to the donations page for other donation options. (Click here to go to the Donations page)

Thank you for your support.

Follow Kangaroo Court of Australia for free and be notified via email immediately there is a new article posted

Enter your email address below and click on the follow button. You can unfollow at any time. 

Processing…

Success! You’re on the list.

Whoops! There was an error and we couldn’t process your subscription. Please reload the page and try again.

Source

‘Climate Change Causes Domestic Violence’ — Women’s Ambassador

‘Climate Change Causes Domestic Violence’ — Women’s Ambassador

Whatever happened to personal responsibility? Now domestic violence aggressors can blame their actions on climate change. How convenient.

Australia has an Ambassador for Women and Girls. Who knew?

She was completely absent during the debate on women’s sport. Maybe she got caught up in the kitchen.

But don’t worry, the Ambassador is on the job now, warning that climate change will increase domestic violence.

Seriously.

In a video message released last month for the 50th meeting of the UN Human Rights Council, Ambassador Christine Clarke said:

“As we confront the climate crisis, women and girls and human rights must be at the centre of our collective efforts.

“Climate change and its consequences can exacerbate the risk of sexual and gender-based violence.

“This risk is most acute for women and girls facing multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination and inequality, including indigenous women and girls.

“Australia would welcome the panelists view on good practices addressing violence against women and girls in the context of climate change.”

The ambassador will need a chiropractor after the contortions she performed to link the two topics. Or did one set of notes get mixed in with another?

It sounded like she was trying to say that rising sea levels will cause men to attack their wives.

In brief: Climate change makes men angry!

Just roll with it, it’s science.

That said, it was disappointing that the Ambassador did not see fit to address systemic transphobia experienced by indigenous genderqueer communities whenever cows release methane.

No Rebuttals Permitted

Tellingly, Ambassador Clarke tweeted her speech, only to quickly restrict the comments when people started pointing out that it was nothing but a woke word salad.

The public gets it. Our elites do not.

Climate change reminds me of Homer Simpson daydreaming about doughnuts. Homer wonders in awe:

“Donuts… Is there nothing they can’t do?”

Anyway, I’m sure the only way to fight violence against “women and girls in all their diversity” (one can only assume that phrase was used to leave a little wriggle room for women and girls with penises) is to throw money at the clouds.

If we pay more taxes, stop driving SUVs and become vegetarians, women will be safe from men who — let’s face it — are driven crazy by storms.

Depending on which report you read, indigenous women are between 30 and 80 times more likely to experience domestic abuse than non-indigenous women. That’s how badly climate change is affecting aboriginal communities!

But men and women will dwell together in peace if we can limit global warming to below 1.5 degrees Celsius.

And net-zero emissions will usher in a new era of harmony between the sexes.

Everybody is milking the taxpayer over climate change, and in some ways, you have to grudgingly admire the ambassador for finding an angle.

Old Hat

On the other hand, she is really just repeating a worn-out line that the Greens tried back in 2019 when a women’s rights activist, flanked by Greens senator Larissa Waters, warned that bushfires would spark domestic violence.

“After a cataclysmic event like this, domestic violence peaks,” the activist said. “Women become extremely unsafe, when generally the men return home from the fires and subject them to domestic violence.”

No one was buying the ‘fires turn men into wife beaters’ line back then.

And judging by the reaction to Ambassador Clarke’s speech, no one is buying the ‘warm days turn men into monsters’ shtick now.

Climate change doesn’t create domestic violence, but woke idiocy does turn domestic violence into a joke. And that’s the real danger here.

Stupidity like this is what makes people desensitised and non-empathetic towards important issues, such as domestic violence.

___

Originally published at The James Macpherson Report.
Subscribe to his Substack here for daily witty commentary.

Thank the Source

Open Letter to Australia’s Doctors: Preserve Our Children

Open Letter to Australia’s Doctors: Preserve Our Children

Paediatrician Dr Dylan Wilson speaks up about the unethical practices of doctors who are subjecting vulnerable children to puberty blockers, with scant scientific basis, motivated by transgender ideology. He begs medical practitioners to reconsider before more of our youth have lifelong harm inflicted upon them.

Dear Doctor,

In Australia, we have a clear template of the standard referral pathway. General practitioners refer to specialists, who refer to sub-specialists. Whenever we feel we need a more specialised opinion than our own, we refer the patient to a colleague along this pathway. We can often choose to whom we refer; we may value a particular practitioner’s expertise on a particular matter, or we may know that someone may suit the patient best. This is most evident in the private system.

There are also times when we don’t get a choice, a patient has to be referred to a general service in the public system. While this may have issues, there are often benefits, and there are many times when referring a patient to the local public hospital service is in their best interests.

This is often true for children. Our tertiary children’s hospitals, situated in the state capital cities around Australia, offer not just specialised services that may not be able to be accessed elsewhere, but a multitude of services that can serve a child’s whole needs. It is recognised that for many diseases and conditions, a holistic or specialised service offered at a child’s local children’s hospital serves their best interests.

The simplest example is cancer; all children who are diagnosed with cancer are treated by a team of specialists whose concentrated knowledge and expertise, in a multi-disciplinary team, provides the best care. No one would ever dream of treating a child with chemotherapy without this team’s knowledge and input.

Unethical

But there exists a service at my local children’s hospital, and at other hospitals around the country, to which I will never refer a child. I believe this service is not appropriate for children, and is actively doing harm, and this open letter is my way of reaching out to you to urge you to consider your role in this referral pathway.

I am talking about the paediatric gender service at my local children’s hospital.

What I mean specifically are the paediatric endocrinologists that are part of the paediatric gender service, but seeing as it seems you can’t refer to the paediatric gender service without a paediatric endocrinologist getting involved at some stage, the whole service needs to be included.

In Australia, as a country and a medical profession, we are completely behind on this. Many of you reading this will have little knowledge of what role paediatric endocrinologists have in treating children in this clinic. It may be that the first time it has come to your attention is during this election campaign, when old tweets by the Liberal candidate for Warringah, Katherine Deves came to light. In one she tweeted about “vulnerable children surgically mutilated and sterilised”. The uproar and backlash in the media were furious.

There is a simple reason why Ms Deves tweeted about children being surgically mutilated and sterilised.

It’s because children are being surgically mutilated and sterilised.

The backlash against this tweet focused on the fact that in Australia, patients have to reach the age of 18 before any surgery on genitals can take place. For the time being, let’s ignore the fact that having to reach the age of 18 before a patient’s underdeveloped genitals are surgically mutilated is not the stone-cold “gotcha” Ms Deves’s critics think it is. Let’s focus on the facts.

Around the world, there are girls as young as 13 who have had a bilateral mastectomy because of the dysphoria about their bodies. This has been done in gender clinics, and also by unscrupulous private surgeons, who as a marketing tool, might describe this surgery as “yeeting the teets”. Ms Deves probably knows this. There was nothing in her tweet that was specific to genital surgery in Australia. That’s something her critics inferred. Ms Deves thinks girls this age having completely healthy breast tissue removed because of their mental health struggles is mutilation. So do I.

Creating Infertility

And the backlash that focused on the “surgically mutilated” part, conveniently failed to address the part about children being sterilised. This is where paediatric endocrinologists come in.

The medical affirmative pathway for gender-diverse children is known as the Dutch Protocol, due to its beginnings in the Netherlands. It consists of three steps:

  1. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists, commonly known as puberty blockers, to suppress the levels of LH and FSH, and thus suppress puberty.
  2. “Gender-affirming” or “cross-sex” hormones, usually started at 16, to “affirm” a child’s body with the appearance of the sex they wish they were; males get oestrogen, females get testosterone.
  3. Surgery, in a variety of forms ranging from simple cosmetic procedures to major surgery like mastectomy and genital surgery.

The problem is the puberty blockers and the problem is this:

Paediatric endocrinologists in gender clinics in Australia and around the world are taking a cohort of physically healthy children and they are suppressing the puberty of these children at its earliest active stage, Tanner Stage 2. Puberty for these children is never allowed to progress. The bodies of these children are frozen forever at this stage, even though they are growing chronologically older. Contrary to the popular belief, puberty blockers are not a “pause”. We now know that at least 98% of children who commence puberty blockers continue along the affirmative pathway onto cross-sex hormones.

When gender clinics say puberty blockers are reversible they are telling a truth, but they are being disingenuous. When they say puberty blockers are a “pause” to give children time to think, they are certainly being economical with the truth. They know that those children are now set along this pathway. There is no pause. There is no reversal.

The paediatric endocrinologist then takes that body, frozen at the physical state of early puberty, and masculinises or feminises that body, depending on the child’s sex.

They are creating a cohort of adults with children’s bodies, just adulterated by testosterone or oestrogen.

If a child has their body arrested at Tanner stage 2, how does that child develop fertility? The simple answer is, they can’t. We all need the later stages of puberty to fully develop sperm and eggs. They have been sterilised by medical means. They have been sterilised by doctors at our children’s hospitals.

If a child has their body arrested at Tanner stage 2, how does a child develop sexual function? The simple answer is, they can’t. They have been rendered sexually dysfunctional adults by medical means, by doctors at our children’s hospitals.

If a child has their body arrested at Tanner stage 2, then is subjected to abnormal levels of exogenously administered hormones for which that body is not equipped, how do they escape harm? The simple answer is, they can’t. They have been committed to a lifetime of hormone-induced iatrogenic disease by doctors at our children’s hospitals.

Causing Disease

And here lies my first problem with paediatric gender endocrinologists. They do the exact opposite of all other endocrinologists. The whole point of endocrinology is to treat disease caused by hormone levels being pathologically elevated or depressed. The whole point of endocrinology is to put hormone levels back into the normal range. This is true of every endocrine disease — diabetes, thyroid disease, adrenal insufficiency and so on.

But not when it comes to treating gender-diverse children. When a child enters the clinic of a paediatric gender endocrinologist for their first injection of a puberty blocker, they have zero endocrine disease. That child’s hormone levels are all exactly where they should be. Their gonadotropins are normal, their sex hormones are normal for the stage of puberty. They have no disease.

Yet when they leave, the paediatric gender endocrinologist has induced abnormal hormone levels. In that child, a doctor has deliberately suppressed normal hormone levels to treat, not endocrine disease, but that child’s mental distress.

When that child turns 16, that iatrogenic hormone suppression has continued. The paediatric gender endocrinologist then goes one step further, and deliberately introduces exogenous sex hormones. They deliberately raise a female’s testosterone to levels that can only be described as pathological. They deliberately raise a male’s oestrogen levels too. They continue to suppress that child’s own natural sex hormone levels.

They are inducing iatrogenic disease. On purpose. Not as a side effect, but deliberately.

In what other circumstance would this be considered acceptable? Within endocrinology, can you imagine another similar circumstance? If any endocrinologist was to deliberately elevate or suppress a patient’s thyroxine level outside the normal range, they would be subjected to disciplinary action. But it has been deemed acceptable for paediatric gender endocrinologists to do this with gonadotropins and sex hormones. Why?

In what other speciality would this be considered acceptable? A physically healthy child never enters a paediatric gastroenterologist’s clinic and leaves with gastrointestinal disease that wasn’t there before. Why are physically healthy children seeing specialists who treat disease the child doesn’t have?

Everything paediatric gender endocrinologists do is antithetical to both paediatrics and endocrinology.

The aim of paediatrics is to ensure children reach adulthood as healthy as possible. Paediatric gender endocrinologists take physically healthy children and commit them to a lifetime of medicalisation.

Spurious

If a child has significantly delayed puberty at the age of 16, a paediatric endocrinologist will help initiate it, because we all recognise that puberty is an essential component of human development that gives us all that we need to be healthy adults. Paediatric gender endocrinologists have decided puberty is now optional for some children, and those essentials aren’t required.

The evidence for this pathway is low. Its aim, to improve mental health outcomes, remains weakly supported. And everyone else knows it. Everyone else is talking about it. The UK’s National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) appraised the evidence for both puberty blockers and cross-sex hormones and found the evidence “very low”. This pathway has been subject to a judicial review. The NHS asked Dr Hilary Cass, past President of the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, to review the treatment of gender-diverse children. She wrote in her Interim report that

“At this stage the Review is not able to provide advice on the use of hormone treatments due to gaps in the evidence base.”

The Karolinska Institutet, the seat of the Nobel prize for medicine, has recommended immediate cessation of this pathway for all children under the age of 18. Even one of the original Dutch clinicians has expressed concern about the rest of the world adopting this pathway blindly.

The world has started to take notice of the problems this pathway brings and is undertaking a review.

This brings me to the second and most important reason why you should never refer to your local paediatric gender clinic here in Australia. They know all this. They know the implications of this pathway. They know it has problems like infertility. They know the evidence is weak. They know there is scrutiny elsewhere. They know. But they carry on anyway. There is little acknowledgment, except for the clinicians at Westmead, that there is anything to see here. According to most gender clinics in Australia, everything is fine and dandy.

I took part in an online education series in November and December last year, run by my local gender clinic. I was genuinely interested in what they had to say. There have been so many developments over the preceding year or two I was sure they would discuss the difficulties and the controversies.

But there was nothing. Not a single mention of any of the concerns. They told an online audience across the state that everything was fine. It was a demonstration of ideology, not medicine.

No child should be treated in a clinic, run by a tertiary children’s hospital, that places ideology above self-reflection and evidence. No child should be treated in a clinic that doesn’t have the courage in its convictions to come out and publicly acknowledge that they are in fact sterilising children. No child should be treated in a clinic that does not disclose its treatments, its numbers, or any statistics. If you refer a child to my local children’s hospital paediatric gender clinic, what is the likelihood that the child will be given puberty blockers? What is the likelihood they won’t stop them? I asked my local clinic, and they wouldn’t tell me.

Duty of Care

We are in the midst of a medical scandal. This is happening under our noses. We are all somewhat complicit; we have failed to support our colleagues who have raised concerns before, we have blindly assumed that a children’s hospital must be doing the right thing simply because it’s the children’s hospital.

We haven’t asked questions. Or we’ve been too afraid to. It may be that the people doing this are colleagues we work alongside and know are good people and it seems wrong to criticise them. But the only way to bring this to the fore is if, as a profession, we stand up and push for that scrutiny. We need openness from the clinics. We need honesty. We need acknowledgement of the truth.

We need to discuss all of the issues with which I have barely scratched the surface here — the huge explosion of girls presenting, the high rates of autism and trauma, the concern over brain maturation, children being treated on this pathway while in the care of protective services, the influence of social media, the stories of those who detransition long after the paediatric gender services are done with them, and above all, consent. Can a child at the age of 11 or 12, when puberty is just starting, consent to this pathway and all of its outcomes both known and unknown? This is the most important question of all.

It’s likely I will attract criticism about “politicising children”, given the election. But when are we going to have this conversation in Australia? When are we going to confront and acknowledge the reality of what we are doing to children, even if you’re convinced it’s the right path? If not now, when? When a critical number of those children look back on the life they’ve been given and ask why did it happen? It will be too late. It is already too late for some. Right now, in Australia, there are children, teenagers and adults among us who have been committed to this lifetime of medicalisation. I want to make sure there aren’t any more.

Primum non nocere.

Thank the Source

Leaving a Godly Heritage

Leaving a Godly Heritage

How do we form our children in the faith and bestow a Godly heritage upon them? Let us turn to God’s Word for inspiration and instruction.

Sons are a heritage from the Lord
Children are a reward from Him.
~ Psalm 127:3 (NIV)

What does leaving a Godly heritage look like? What does it mean ‘to leave a Godly heritage?’

Heritage can relate to many things, but for our purpose, we will use the Oxford Dictionary definition, which in part states: Heritage is “valued qualities and cultural traditions that have been passed down from previous generations.”

The instructions written by Asaph in the 78th Psalm, especially verses 5-7, encapsulate how ‘heritage’ can be a living experience to perpetuate the teachings of our God and His achievements. It is written:

He decreed statutes for Jacob, and established the law in Israel,
which He commanded our forefathers to teach to their children,
so that the next generation would know them, even the children yet to be born,
and they in turn would tell their children.
Then they would put their trust in God
and not forget His deeds but would keep His commands.’

The Big Question

Is this happening in your home and the homes of the families involved in the church? How do we teach and nurture our heritage? Do we pass on all we know about our Lord to our children and teach and encourage them to teach their children?

The family home is the most crucial and important learning environment for our children. It is here, in their early formative years, where the child will be most influenced — for better or for worse. They will learn (or not) to bond with those around them.

Children learn language, positive and negative behaviour, and how to interact with others in the home. Modern research confirms that the first five years of a child’s life are the most crucial and vital time to instil good attitudes and create healthy habits, especially regarding their spiritual growth and understanding.

Research by the noted developmental psychologist and anthropologist at Oxford University, Justin L Barret, about the value of religious faith, has found that we are all predisposed to believe in God from birth. This would be consistent with the Scripture in Ecclesiastes 3:11 —

He has also set eternity in the hearts of men….”

To further explore what it means to leave a Godly heritage, let us now consider the instructions given to Moses before the Israelites went into the Promised Land. Consider how these instructions relate to us today.

My conviction is that these Scriptures set out God’s plan for families and demonstrate how to impart the parents’ faith to their children. I use the word to impart the parent’s faith, as opposed to imposing their faith on their children. The home is the place where children should be introduced to the Lord of Creation and the Saviour of the World.

Deuteronomy 6:4-9 is known as the Shema (pronounced “Shem-ar”) and is worthy of our examination. These instructions for the family were given to Moses to be passed on. It is considered by devout Jews as the most critical and significant portion of the book of Deuteronomy.

Jewish children are taught this as a prayer. Devout Jews recite it three times a day. Each Friday evening, as the Sabbath begins, in Jewish homes around the world, the father, and sometimes the mother, lay hands on the children’s heads and pray for them.

Deuteronomy 6:4–9  (NIV)

Verse 4

“Hear O Israel: The Lord our God is one.”

‘You shall have no other gods before Me’, states the First Commandment. The land into which the Jews were going was a land with a multitude of gods. Sadly, this is the same as the society our children find themselves in today. We have the answers to help them make the right decisions.

Verse 5

“Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength.”

An expert in the law tested Jesus with a question. “Teacher, which is the greatest commandment in the Law?” Jesus quoted this Scripture in Matthew 22:37. “Love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul and with all your mind (might).”

Jesus then went on to say in verses 38-40, “This is the first and greatest commandment. And the second is like it: ‘Love your neighbour as yourself.’ All the Law and the Prophets hang on these two commandments.” 

Our children are in desperate need of godly role models. This is a great opportunity for parents, teachers, uncles, aunties and grandparents to be those role models who demonstrate that they love the Lord with all their hearts, all their souls and all their minds.

THOUGHT: If I expect my children to pray, then they need to see me praying.

If I expect my children to love the Word of God, they need to see that in me.

If I expect my children to love the Lord their God with all their hearts, with all their souls and with all their minds, guess where they will be looking?

Verse 6

“These commandments that I give you today are to be upon your hearts.”

Notice that this is a commandment, not just any ordinary instruction. Dare I say, not unlike the well-known Ten Commandments!  The Lord tells us these words are to be in our hearts. These are not just for head knowledge, but are to be an outward demonstration and expression of our inner beliefs and convictions.

Verse 7

“Impress them on your children.
Talk about them when you sit at home
and when you walk along the road,
when you lie down and when you get up.”

The word used to “impress” means to engrave. Not merely talking but living it out, which is much harder. We do this to impart our faith, as opposed to imposing our faith on our children. If as parents we use the “do what I say and not what I do” line, it will not work in the long term.

Whom to impress — Our children

What to impress — The Word of God

Where to impress — Walking, lying down, getting up, and sitting down or,
use every appropriate and suitable opportunity.

When to impress — All the time.

This is a “lifestyle” that should be evident in our everyday life.

Verse 8

“Tie them as symbols on your hands and bind them on your foreheads.”

It is always a joy when you see young people wearing the WWJD (What Would Jesus Do?) bracelets or something similar, and T-shirts that have a Christian message. Not only are these reminders important for our children who are feeling comfortable with a faith that is their own, but we also need to be reminded of the word of God. Hopefully, as they wear these obviously Christian items, they will also become competent in articulating their beliefs.

Verse 9

“Write them on the door frames of your houses and on your gates.”

It is possible to have various reminders, such as Scriptures around the house and other Christian symbols, such as the Nativity scene during the Christmas season. We should endeavour to give our children books, games and items that will strengthen their faith and not cause them to stumble. These practices should begin when the child is very young.

Challenge: To take God’s commandments seriously.

What are the consequences of ignoring God’s instruction for our families?

Let us look at what happened to the Jewish nation when they ignored God’s instructions.

About 120-150 years after entering the Promised Land and experiencing God’s grace, we read these words.

Judges 2:8-11

Verse 8

“Joshua son of Nun died, the servant of the Lord died at the age of one hundred and ten.”

Verse 9

“And they buried him in the land of his inheritance,
at Timnath Heres in the hill country of Ephraim, north of Mount Gaash.”

The influence of the godly men and women has now passed away.

Verse 10

After that whole generation had been gathered to their fathers,
another generation grew up, who knew neither the Lord
nor what He had done for Israel
.

After all the wonderful blessings of God, a WHOLE generation grew up who not only did not know the Lord but did not know the awesome things God had done for Israel!

Verse 11

Then the Israelites did evil in the eyes of the Lord and served the Baal.

Many of this generation do not know the Lord nor the incredible things He has done in the development of our great nation, Australia, or for that matter, Western civilisation.

That generation did not understand or did not know how to live in a Godly manner. They pursued a destructive and flawed lifestyle with dire consequences. Knowledge of a Godly heritage was not successfully taught or adopted.

Tragically, both of these situations happen too often in Australia and the Western world today.

What heritage will you offer your children to receive and adopt as a lifestyle?

THOUGHT: How seriously do we take God’s instructions about teaching our children?

Suggested reading

  • George Barna, “Transforming Children into Spiritual Champions”
  • Ted Baehr and Pat Boone, “The Culture-Wise Family”
  • Mark Griffiths, “One Generation from Extinction”

___

Photo by Vlada Karpovich.

Thank the Source

Helen Cadbury: Founding Member of the Pocket Testament League

Formed by a faithful family and married to a devout husband, Helen Cadbury went on to share the Word of God through the Pocket Testament League, which continues its salvific work today.

Helen CadburyHelen was only twelve when she went with her father, Richard Cadbury, and sat at the back of a hall watching volunteers talking with the people coming in from the local neighbourhood. Some of the people coming in looked poor and even hungry, and some, sadly, were affected by alcohol.

Richard cared very much for poor people and did a lot to help them. He had built a big hall for just this purpose. He and fellow Christians invited men, women and children from the neighbourhood to come and, depending on the difficulty of their circumstances, they might be given a meal or some clothes. While he showed them in this practical way what the love of God looked like, visitors could also hear about the love of God.

On this day, Helen listened as the preacher finished explaining how people, through trusting in Jesus and what he had done on the cross, could have their sins forgiven and have a good relationship with God. His words moved Helen, and she decided that day that Jesus’ love was for her, too.

Helen’s family had strong roots in the Christian faith. Her grandfather, John Cadbury, was also already well-known as the founder of the Cadbury cocoa and chocolate company in Birmingham. It was the faith of the members of the Cadbury family that drove them to care about the welfare of those who worked for them, and for underprivileged people in their community.

Childhood Faith

Helen Cadbury PTLAt school, Helen kept a Bible in her desk. At break times, she liked to bring her Bible out to show other girls verses about how to become a Christian and how God would want them to live. But it wasn’t easy carrying a Bible around in the playground, so Helen and her Christian friends had pockets made in their dresses for carrying a Bible or a New Testament. These girls shared a keen interest in sharing their faith with their friends at school. By 1893, when Helen was 16, the group had become known as the ‘Pocket Testament League’ and had a membership of 60 girls.

Helen Cadbury AlexanderAs Helen grew up into a young lady, the enthusiasm she had for her faith started to wane. Helen went to college and there learned different ideas and opinions about Christianity. Many of her college lecturers made anti-God statements, and this caused Helen to have serious doubts about whether the whole Bible was the true word of God.

However, all that changed after her father’s death. Helen began helping her mother back at the big hall her father had built where she had first put her trust in God. Helen again saw the love of God being lived out before her eyes through her mother and the others who were helping the poor. Gradually, her faith returned to what she had believed as a schoolgirl.

Sharing the Word

In the years that followed, Helen married the famous evangelist and song leader, Charles Alexander. Together with some other evangelists, they brought ‘The Pocket Testament League’ back to life. It is estimated that over 100 million portions of Scripture have been distributed by the Pocket Testament League — and it’s still going strong today!

The Pocket Testament League has produced many stories about people whose lives were wonderfully transformed through reading the Bible. One such story is of Captain Mitsuo Fuchida, the Japanese commander who led the attacks on Pearl Harbor and Darwin but found faith in God and forgiveness after the war was over, which you can read about here at Did You Know Education.

Many people across the world have become followers of Jesus, all because a young girl was determined to share her faith with others and help those in need.

___

By Jordan Jamieson. Originally published at Did You Know? Education. Photo by Andrea Piacquadio.

Thank the Source

Helen Cadbury: Founding Member of the Pocket Testament League

Helen Cadbury: Founding Member of the Pocket Testament League

Formed by a faithful family and married to a devout husband, Helen Cadbury went on to share the Word of God through the Pocket Testament League, which continues its salvific work today.

Helen CadburyHelen was only twelve when she went with her father, Richard Cadbury, and sat at the back of a hall watching volunteers talking with the people coming in from the local neighbourhood. Some of the people coming in looked poor and even hungry, and some, sadly, were affected by alcohol.

Richard cared very much for poor people and did a lot to help them. He had built a big hall for just this purpose. He and fellow Christians invited men, women and children from the neighbourhood to come and, depending on the difficulty of their circumstances, they might be given a meal or some clothes. While he showed them in this practical way what the love of God looked like, visitors could also hear about the love of God.

On this day, Helen listened as the preacher finished explaining how people, through trusting in Jesus and what he had done on the cross, could have their sins forgiven and have a good relationship with God. His words moved Helen, and she decided that day that Jesus’ love was for her, too.

Helen’s family had strong roots in the Christian faith. Her grandfather, John Cadbury, was also already well-known as the founder of the Cadbury cocoa and chocolate company in Birmingham. It was the faith of the members of the Cadbury family that drove them to care about the welfare of those who worked for them, and for underprivileged people in their community.

Childhood Faith

Helen Cadbury PTLAt school, Helen kept a Bible in her desk. At break times, she liked to bring her Bible out to show other girls verses about how to become a Christian and how God would want them to live. But it wasn’t easy carrying a Bible around in the playground, so Helen and her Christian friends had pockets made in their dresses for carrying a Bible or a New Testament. These girls shared a keen interest in sharing their faith with their friends at school. By 1893, when Helen was 16, the group had become known as the ‘Pocket Testament League’ and had a membership of 60 girls.

Helen Cadbury AlexanderAs Helen grew up into a young lady, the enthusiasm she had for her faith started to wane. Helen went to college and there learned different ideas and opinions about Christianity. Many of her college lecturers made anti-God statements, and this caused Helen to have serious doubts about whether the whole Bible was the true word of God.

However, all that changed after her father’s death. Helen began helping her mother back at the big hall her father had built where she had first put her trust in God. Helen again saw the love of God being lived out before her eyes through her mother and the others who were helping the poor. Gradually, her faith returned to what she had believed as a schoolgirl.

Sharing the Word

In the years that followed, Helen married the famous evangelist and song leader, Charles Alexander. Together with some other evangelists, they brought ‘The Pocket Testament League’ back to life. It is estimated that over 100 million portions of Scripture have been distributed by the Pocket Testament League — and it’s still going strong today!

The Pocket Testament League has produced many stories about people whose lives were wonderfully transformed through reading the Bible. One such story is of Captain Mitsuo Fuchida, the Japanese commander who led the attacks on Pearl Harbor and Darwin but found faith in God and forgiveness after the war was over, which you can read about here at Did You Know Education.

Many people across the world have become followers of Jesus, all because a young girl was determined to share her faith with others and help those in need.

___

By Jordan Jamieson. Originally published at Did You Know? Education. Photo by Andrea Piacquadio.

Thank the Source

What It’s Like to Be a TV Political Commentator

What It’s Like to Be a TV Political Commentator

People have been asking me what it’s like to appear on Sky News as a political commentator. Well, it’s like this…

You spend all day nervously preparing for five minutes of live television. And then — when it’s over — you devote the rest of the evening to forensically dissecting 300 seconds of your life in a bid to determine whether or not you should ever have been born.

You check your text messages to see which, if any, of your friends saw the segment and approved.

Then you check Twitter to see how many trolls are commenting on your sexuality.

Then you go back to your text messages.

Damn, a single text from Mum. And she doesn’t even have Sky. She just wants to know how I went.

Well, Mum, according to the Twitter mob…

Invitation

Anyway, here’s how it typically works.

You get an email mid to late afternoon on the day you are appearing, advising the topics to be covered.

You sweat on that email.

The earlier it arrives, the more time you have to prepare. But as noon turns into 3pm and then becomes 3.10pm and is suddenly 3.30pm and now 3.31pm… the tension builds.

I hear the ping my email makes when a new one drops. It’s the Sky News producer outlining six to ten subjects we will cover tonight.

The first one I have no idea about. The Queensland government has increased mining royalties.

Heck.

Google mining royalties.

Google coal, and coal jobs, and coal share price… and while I’m at it I’ll google AFL news because it’s impossible to be online and to stay on point.

Wait. No. I’m on television in a couple of hours. The AFL can wait.

Google Queensland state budget. That’s a good idea.

The Clock is Ticking

Okay, now I’ve read too much. It’s 4.20pm and there are still another eight subjects to get my head around.

But before I can move on, I need to summarise what I’ve learned about the government’s royalties grab and decide what I think. Then I need to jot down bite-sized thoughts that will be good to deliver on live television.

Royalties on coal revenue went from 15% to 40% (when the price of coal is $300 a tonne or more — which it is). Imagine running a business expecting to pay 15% tax and then being hit with 40%.

Investor confidence. Job losses. Broken election promises. They are all jotted down on my notepad.

A coal mining executive described it as like “going to bed in Queensland and waking up in Argentina”. That’s a great line. I’ll use that.

The next topic is similar. Energy Minister Chris Bowen has blamed the lack of maintenance on coal-fired power stations for the energy shortage. I know about this. I’ve read it in the news.

But what do I think about it?

Well, the crazy thing about the energy crisis is that it was all completely foreseeable, right?

Governments implement policies that discourage investment in coal-fired power stations… and then blame the lack of investment in coal-fired power stations for the energy crisis. It’s idiocy.

Jot that down. That’ll make a good grab.

I think you need pithy statements that make the point but that are also memorable, or clever. Lucky I’m pithy and clever.

And humble. Some say I’m a humble man with much to be humble about. That’s a Winston Churchill line. Stop distracting me. It’s already 5pm.

Cutting It Close

Topic three is more government taxes. This time Queensland want to impose a tourism levy. I’m clueless on this. I mean, off the top of my head, it doesn’t make much sense, does it?

Tourists are price sensitive — or at least I am — and it’s incredibly naïve to think that government levies won’t drive tourist numbers down.

Okay, here’s another thought off the top of my head. Won’t the government use the new tax to replace existing funding that will be reallocated elsewhere? So the tourism industry will be no better off but tourists will be worse off, which means ultimately the tourism industry itself will be worse off.

Good thought, James. You’re on fire. So’s the clock. It’s 5.30pm already!

Now I’m reading articles on tourism levies around the world. Did you know some European cities are using tourism levies to address what they call “over-tourism”?

So you’ve got European countries using tourism levies to keep tourist numbers at a manageable level, and you’ve got the Queensland government insisting a tourism levy won’t adversely affect tourist numbers. They can’t both be right.

I’m pretty happy with a few tourism zingers that are now sitting, television-ready, on my notepad.

Damn. Look at the time.

Mounting Pressure

Is my laptop charged?

I need another coffee.

I don’t have time to pee.

I’m going to pee anyway.

I didn’t really pee. I mean, I stood there like I was going to pee, but I didn’t pee. Stupid nerves playing tricks on my bladder.

I’ve only got an hour before I’m on. And the email says they want to talk about Sri Lankans being the first “net-zero refugees”.

Huh?

I’m googling “net-zero refugees” but I can’t find anything.

I’m reasonably familiar with Sri Lanka. Good tea. Average cricket team. But net-zero refugees? Nadar. Nil. Nothing.

I’m running out of time and so I make the fateful decision to skip that topic. I’m appearing on a panel, after all, with a government senator. Surely he’ll get that question.

(You just know what’s going to happen, don’t you?)

Acing it

What’s left?

Greens leader Adam Bandt’s refusal to stand in front of the Australian flag. I’m all over this one. I wrote about it for The Spectator earlier in the week.

Greens Senator Lidia Thorpe admitting that she only swore allegiance to “the colonising Queen” in order to infiltrate parliament. Oh I love this one.

It must be tricky to be a member of the Australian Senate while arguing that the Australian Senate is illegitimate.

Well, not if you cross your fingers when you take the oath of allegiance, it’s not!

I’m making myself laugh. Am I funny? I don’t know. Hopefully Mum will think so.

Wait. Mum doesn’t have Sky television. Why is she so cheap? Does she not love me? I don’t have time to worry about that now.

I jot down thoughts on a couple of other topics and then I come to the last one which is perfect. They want to discuss an article I wrote for The Spectator on the Essex Police. I’ll nail this one.

Oh no. Is that the time?

Crunch Time

I set up my laptop.

Where are my earphones? You need earphones or you get an echo during the broadcast, which is never good.

That laptop angle is all wrong. Viewers will see straight up my nose. A box. I need a box to put my laptop on.

Laptop is now perched on a box. Microphone is sitting on a book so it’s as close to me as possible while remaining out of shot.

Am I ready?

I wish I had more hair. Too late to do anything about that.

There’s a Sky News producer in my ear telling me we are on in 30 seconds.

Why is it that I haven’t needed to cough all day and now, with 10 seconds remaining before I appear on live television, I have a frog in my throat? What are the odds?

Quick coughs.

Water.

Shove the glass out of shot.

Thanks, it’s great to be with you,” I reply, as the host, Rowan Dean, introduces me.

Remember that coal mining royalties subject? I’m not asked about it. That line about waking up in Argentina would have been soooo good. Never mind.

I think I’m about to be asked about the energy crisis. Yep. Here it comes.

Well, Rowan…

And I’m away. A few stumbles over some words, but it’s okay.

The senator is now talking about the tourism levy. I’m not asked about it. Pity. I’d scribbled down some good thoughts.

Now the host is introducing the Sri Lanka refugees topic.

Oh no. NO!

It occurs to me that the senator spoke last so there’s a good chance the host will throw the topic to…

Hell. He’s asking me about it.

I give a short answer, pivoting the topic to the Government’s border policy which is easier to talk about and kind of on point, but not really. I think I got away with it. The senator takes up the subject and nails it. Thank God.

Here come the Greens politicians.

I’ve got a line ready for this.

Well Rowan, Green herbs come in many types, but Dill is the best descriptor for this one.

The host is laughing. And the senator is laughing as well. I mean, he’s roaring with laughter. This is good.

I make the point that if Lidia Thorpe is the indigenous “Voice” to parliament, then it should make voters think twice when we are asked to change the constitution via a referendum during this government’s term.

The host says I make a great point (why thank you) and asks the senator if he agrees.

“Nice work,” I think to myself. Nice work.

I feel like I’ve got my groove on now, and with the Essex Police topic to come, I’m ready to dominate.

Well that’s all we have time for tonight. Thanks James Macpherson and Senator Matt Canavan for joining me.

Wait.

What?

But…

And that’s it.

My phone buzzes. It’s Mum wanting to know how I went.

(I’m doing it all over again tonight on The Bolt Report around 7.30pm.)

___

Originally published at The James Macpherson Report.
Subscribe to his Substack here for daily witty commentary.

Thank the Source

error

Please help truthPeep spread the word :)