Flint, Mich. Clerk Resigns After Elections Group Calls Out Lopsided Number Of Democrat Poll Watchers

Flint, Mich. Clerk Resigns After Elections Group Calls Out Lopsided Number Of Democrat Poll Watchers

Flint, Michigan’s longtime city clerk is retiring after an election integrity group sent a letter to her office demanding she balance out the number of Democrat and Republican election inspectors. 

On Sept. 6, Pure Integrity Michigan Elections (PIME) and attorney Erick Kaardal of the Thomas More Society sent a demand letter to Flint and City Clerk Inez Brown threatening legal action if they do not balance out the number of partisan poll watchers before the November general election. As previously reported, during Flint’s Aug. 2 primary, the city hired 422 Democrats compared to just 27 Republican election inspectors — in direct violation of a Michigan state statute that requires equal representation of party election inspectors. 

On Sept. 8, Brown, after serving as Flint’s city clerk for 25 years, abruptly announced her resignation effective Sept. 30 — roughly one month before the November election. Brown gave no reason for her resignation and caught city officials by surprise.

“My administrative office was taken by surprise,” Flint Mayor Sheldon Neeley told the Flint Beat. “I had no foreknowledge of this occurring this soon.” Because of Brown’s resignation, Neeley reached out to Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson’s office for help running the city’s elections. Benson is up for re-election this year, raising questions about the ethics of her involvement in Flint’s elections.

“Can her office be considered impartial in running the elections in Flint?” Patrice Johnson, chair of PIME told The Federalist. “The law states that if you are running for office, you cannot be an election inspector in the precinct in which you’re running.” 

Despite such questions, Johnson sees Brown’s resignation as a step in the right direction. Brown’s tenure as Flint city clerk has led to multiple controversies, including giving mayoral candidates the wrong filing deadline in 2015 and alleged failure to process absentee ballots

“The pressure we’ve put on the city led to this,” Johnson said. “This is a HUGE win.” 

Regardless of Brown’s resignation, Johnson expects Flint to fully comply with PIME’s demand letter and balance its number of partisan election inspectors in time for the November election.

“In a state with more than 7 million registered voters, and where an election inspector need not live in the precinct in which they work, there is no excuse for an unhealthy imbalance of workers at our township and municipal elections,” she said.


Victoria Marshall is a staff writer at The Federalist. Her writing has been featured in the New York Post, National Review, and Townhall. She graduated from Hillsdale College in May 2021 with a major in politics and a minor in journalism. Follow her on Twitter @vemrshll.

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Flint, Mich. Clerk Resigns After Elections Group Calls Out Lopsided Number Of Democrat Poll Watchers

Flint, Mich. Clerk Resigns After Elections Group Calls Out Lopsided Number Of Democrat Poll Watchers

Flint, Michigan’s longtime city clerk is retiring after an election integrity group sent a letter to her office demanding she balance out the number of Democrat and Republican election inspectors. 

On Sept. 6, Pure Integrity Michigan Elections (PIME) and attorney Erick Kaardal of the Thomas More Society sent a demand letter to Flint and City Clerk Inez Brown threatening legal action if they do not balance out the number of partisan poll watchers before the November general election. As previously reported, during Flint’s Aug. 2 primary, the city hired 422 Democrats compared to just 27 Republican election inspectors — in direct violation of a Michigan state statute that requires equal representation of party election inspectors. 

On Sept. 8, Brown, after serving as Flint’s city clerk for 25 years, abruptly announced her resignation effective Sept. 30 — roughly one month before the November election. Brown gave no reason for her resignation and caught city officials by surprise.

“My administrative office was taken by surprise,” Flint Mayor Sheldon Neeley told the Flint Beat. “I had no foreknowledge of this occurring this soon.” Because of Brown’s resignation, Neeley reached out to Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson’s office for help running the city’s elections. Benson is up for re-election this year, raising questions about the ethics of her involvement in Flint’s elections.

“Can her office be considered impartial in running the elections in Flint?” Patrice Johnson, chair of PIME told The Federalist. “The law states that if you are running for office, you cannot be an election inspector in the precinct in which you’re running.” 

Despite such questions, Johnson sees Brown’s resignation as a step in the right direction. Brown’s tenure as Flint city clerk has led to multiple controversies, including giving mayoral candidates the wrong filing deadline in 2015 and alleged failure to process absentee ballots

“The pressure we’ve put on the city led to this,” Johnson said. “This is a HUGE win.” 

Regardless of Brown’s resignation, Johnson expects Flint to fully comply with PIME’s demand letter and balance its number of partisan election inspectors in time for the November election.

“In a state with more than 7 million registered voters, and where an election inspector need not live in the precinct in which they work, there is no excuse for an unhealthy imbalance of workers at our township and municipal elections,” she said.


Victoria Marshall is a staff writer at The Federalist. Her writing has been featured in the New York Post, National Review, and Townhall. She graduated from Hillsdale College in May 2021 with a major in politics and a minor in journalism. Follow her on Twitter @vemrshll.

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Complaint: Michigan Secretary Of State Broke Law By Outsourcing Voter Roll Cleanup To Left-Wing Group

Complaint: Michigan Secretary Of State Broke Law By Outsourcing Voter Roll Cleanup To Left-Wing Group

The Thomas More Society has filed a complaint with Michigan’s Bureau of Elections against Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson for violating federal law in contracting with the Electronic Registration Information Center (ERIC) to clean her state’s voter rolls.

The complaint — filed on behalf of Pure Integrity Michigan Elections — argues that Benson violated the Help America Vote Act (HAVA) by giving ERIC access to Michigan’s Qualified Voter File, a secure voter list used by the bureau of elections and more than 1,500 election clerks. HAVA requires each secretary of state to maintain and clean voter rolls without outside assistance. 

“Under the Help America Vote Act, maintaining state voter registration is seen as such a core governmental purpose that Congress deemed that it cannot be delegated to any other organization, including Electronic Registration Information Center,” Thomas More Society Special Counsel Erick Kaardal said in a press release. “The Help America Vote Act requires the Michigan secretary of state fulfill her constitutional duty and maintain the Qualified Voter File by herself, even if she does so badly.”

HAVA does not allow states to share voter data with third parties, but Benson’s agreement with ERIC requires her to do so. 

“Under Michigan’s current agreement with Electronic Registration Information Center, the secretary of state must transmit all voter data to the center, as well as licensing and identification records from the motor vehicle department,” Kaardal explained. “That clearly violates the Help America Vote Act and should be ceased immediately.”

As previously reported, ERIC is an interstate voter-roll management system run by Democratic operatives. It was sold to states as an easy solution to clean their voter rolls, but inflates them instead, thereby driving Democrat voter turnout. Thirty-three states and the District of Columbia are listed as members of ERIC. Louisiana recently announced its withdrawal from the agreement. 

A March 2022 audit by Michigan’s auditor general found that the state’s bureau of elections had failed to clean its voter rolls, despite being a member of ERIC since 2019. 

Benson has also been under scrutiny. In June 2020, the Michigan Freedom Fund sued Benson and 16 county clerks for neglecting to maintain Michigan’s voter rolls. In September 2020, Benson padded Michigan’s voter rolls herself by sending out automatic voter registration forms to all eligible citizens. As a result of the mailer, 114,000 people were added to the rolls. Most recently, Benson tried to dismiss a lawsuit removing 26,000 dead registrants from Michigan’s voter rolls.


Victoria Marshall is a staff writer at The Federalist. Her writing has been featured in the New York Post, National Review, and Townhall. She graduated from Hillsdale College in May 2021 with a major in politics and a minor in journalism. Follow her on Twitter @vemrshll.

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Michiganders Blast Secretary Of State Who Claims Her Hands Are Clean In 2020 Election-Funding Scheme

Michiganders Blast Secretary Of State Who Claims Her Hands Are Clean In 2020 Election-Funding Scheme

Michigan voters are calling out Democrat Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson over her claims that she bears no responsibility for a private funding operation that affected election processes leading up to the 2020 general election.

As part of a lawsuit brought by the Thomas More Society on behalf of Michigan voters, the reply brief filed on Aug. 30 addressed Benson’s claims that she is not personally responsible for allowing millions of dollars worth of private grants to flood the state during the 2020 election cycle “because ‘she did not personally hand out the money’ and that the courts have no authority to review her failure to follow Michigan law because the election scheme occurred in the 2020 general election.”

“Secretary Benson is wrong,” said Thomas More Society Special Counsel Thor Hearne. “This lawsuit does not seek to relitigate the results of the 2020 general election. Rather, it is about how future Michigan elections are conducted and Secretary Benson’s responsibility to conduct elections according to Michigan’s Constitution and Election Code so that every Michigan voter has equal access to the ballot.”

Hearne also went on to debunk Benson’s claims that even if such a “private funding scheme is contrary to Michigan’s Constitution and Election Code, she is not responsible and, Michigan voters lack any judicial remedy to hold her accountable.”

Benson does not deny that “she is responsible for supervising Michigan elections and directing how Michigan — and other — election officials conduct the election,” Hearne said. “Nor does she deny that she was fully aware of and supported this private funding scheme. Secretary Benson is asking the court to overlook her responsibility and hold that, because she did not personally pay the money to election officials, she bears no responsibility.”

The lawsuit against Benson was originally filed by the Thomas More Society back in October 2020 in the Michigan Court of Claims over the state’s 2020 use of grants from the left-wing Center for Tech and Civic Life (CTCL), with the legal group alleging that the bid to utilize private grants in the conduction of an election “was intended to influence the election results and den[y] Michigan voters’ right of equal access to the ballot.”

The complaint also argues that “several Michigan election laws were violated when Secretary Benson allowed the use of illegal drop boxes, permitted illegal acquisition of ballot containers that facilitated ballot harvesting, and allowed election authorities to spend public funds for private purposes.”

Given upwards of $400 million by Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg, CTCL was instrumental in quietly altering state and local election processes in the lead-up to the 2020 election. In Michigan alone, the group distributed “135 grants above the $5,000 minimum,” resulting in $16.8 million “Zuckbucks” being poured into localities across the state.

“Out of these grants just 45 of the recipient localities were won by Trump, while 90 were won by Biden. Together these 90 municipalities received $14.6 million or 86 percent of all CTCL funds in Michigan,” a Capital Research Center report found. “Meanwhile, Trump won municipalities overwhelmingly received CTCL’s minimum $5,000 grant, though some received even less.”

As detailed by Federalist Editor-in-Chief Mollie Hemingway in her New York Times bestselling book, “Rigged: How the Media, Big Tech, and the Democrats Seized Our Elections,” Zuckerberg’s financing of “liberal groups running partisan get-out-the-vote operations” such as CTCL and the Center for Election Innovation and Research (CEIR) was ultimately “the means by which [Democrat] activists achieved their ‘revolution’ and changed the course of the 2020 election.”

“It was a genius plan,” wrote Hemingway. “And because no one ever imagined that a coordinated operation could pull off the privatization of the election system, laws were not built to combat it.”

Federalist Contributor William Doyle further expanded upon the effects of CTCL and CEIR’s election funding last year, writing that the groups’ efforts “had nothing to do with traditional campaign finance,” but everything to do “with financing the infiltration of election offices at the city and county level by left-wing activists, and using those offices as a platform to implement preferred administrative practices, voting methods, and data-sharing agreements, as well as to launch intensive outreach campaigns in areas heavy with Democratic voters.”

“CTCL demanded the promotion of universal mail-in voting through suspending election laws, extending deadlines that favored mail-in over in-person voting, greatly expanding opportunities for ‘ballot curing,’ expensive bulk mailings, and other lavish ‘community outreach’ programs that were directed by private activists,” Doyle wrote.

As of September 2022, 24 states and five counties have passed laws banning or restricting public officials’ use of “Zuckbucks” and other private funds when conducting elections.


Shawn Fleetwood is a Staff Writer for The Federalist and a graduate of the University of Mary Washington. He also serves as a state content writer for Convention of States Action and his work has been featured in numerous outlets, including RealClearPolitics, RealClearHealth, and Conservative Review. Follow him on Twitter @ShawnFleetwood

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Judge Denies Michigan Secretary of State’s Motion To Dismiss Lawsuit Removing 26,000 Dead Registrants From Voter Rolls

In a win for election integrity advocates, the United States Western District Court of Michigan denied Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson’s attempt at dismissing Public Interest Legal Foundation’s (PILF) lawsuit pertaining to the failure to remove dead registrants from the state’s voter rolls. The court also dismissed motions to intervene from leftist groups, such as the A. Philip Randolph Institute, the Michigan Alliance for Retired Americans, and Rise, Inc.

In 2020, PILF had notified the Secretary of State’s office about dead registrants remaining on Michigan’s voter rolls, but Benson did nothing about it. In November 2021, the nonprofit filed a lawsuit against Benson for her failure to remove 25,975 deceased registrants from voter lists.

According to PILF’s own analysis of the 25,975 deceased registrants:

  • 23,663 registrants have been dead for five years or more
  • 17,479 registrants have been dead for at least a decade
  • 3,956 registrants have been dead for at least 20 years

PILF’s lawsuit contends that by refusing to clean Michigan’s voter rolls, Benson violated Section 8 of the National Voter Registration Act of 1993, which requires officials to “conduct a general program that makes a reasonable effort to remove the names of ineligible voters from the official lists of eligible voters.” 

Michigan is also a member of ERIC, a voter-roll maintenance organization that ostensibly cleans state voter rolls — meaning the deceased registrants should have been removed long ago.

“We should not have to sue Secretary of State Benson to get her to do her job,” PILF spokeswoman Lauren Bowman told The Federalist. 

This isn’t the first time Benson’s been criticized for her job performance. Back in June 2020, the Michigan Freedom Fund sued Benson and 16 other county clerks for neglecting to maintain accurate voter records. Benson is also known for inflating Michigan’s voter rolls: in September 2020, she sent out automatic voter registration forms to all eligible citizens. As a result of the mailer, 114,000 people were added to Michigan’s voter rolls.

“It is astonishing that Secretary Benson is so vigorously opposing effective list maintenance,” PILF President Christian Adams said in a press release regarding the lawsuit. “It’s remarkable that after sharing this data with the Secretary of State in 2020, dead registrants remained on the state’s voter rolls. This initial win is the first step to ensuring that deceased registrants are not receiving ballots and reducing the opportunity for fraud in Michigan’s elections.”

Last year, the Foundation won a similar lawsuit against Pennsylvania, which compelled the Commonwealth to remove at least 21,000 dead registrants from its voter rolls.


Victoria Marshall is a staff writer at The Federalist. Her writing has been featured in the New York Post, National Review, and Townhall. She graduated from Hillsdale College in May 2021 with a major in politics and a minor in journalism. Follow her on Twitter @vemrshll.

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Exclusive: Zuckerberg-Connected Nonprofit Helped Shift Michigan’s 2020 Voting Rules

Exclusive: Zuckerberg-Connected Nonprofit Helped Shift Michigan’s 2020 Voting Rules

A nonprofit connected to Mark Zuckerberg-funded groups worked with Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson to influence state elections ahead of 2020. The changes include getting the state to alter how it used absentee ballots without an act of the state legislature.

Documents exclusively obtained by The Federalist through an open records request show National Vote at Home Institute CEO Amber McReynolds working with Benson to change Michigan elections policy. NVAHI shares leadership ties with the Center for Tech and Civic Life, a group that shuttled money from Zuckerberg to government election agencies ahead of the 2020 election, as The Federalist previously reported. In several instances, NVAHI and CTCL worked together to influence the 2020 election.

The documents also show that the private organization funded by Facebook tycoon Zuckerberg exists to push states to adopt mass mail-in balloting of the kind that made chaos of the 2020 election.

Mail-in ballots are proven to be significantly more susceptible to fraud, as a bipartisan federal election integrity commission chaired by former President Jimmy Carter concluded in 2005. That’s because mail-in ballots provide more opportunities to influence, obtain, and traffic in ballots.

In one recent example, during a 2017 city council election in Dallas, Texas, investigators found one person had fraudulently signed 700 mail-in ballots—more than the total vote difference between competing candidates at the time. During the 2020 election in Wisconsin, officials took part in ballot trafficking and used drop-boxes for mail-in ballots, which a judge later ruled violated state law.

Private Groups Telling Public Employees What To Do

In Michigan, this highly partisan organization directly affected voting rules, the new documents show. In the emails, McReynolds suggested that Benson use administrative rulemaking to implement a permanent absentee voting option in the state. Administrative rulemaking means making regulations based on an interpretation of the law, often yielding regulations that differ from the law’s original intent and sometimes its explicit text.

“I was thinking that you may have rule-making authority,” McReynolds wrote in an email on Feb. 5, 2019. “The language below indicates that voters have a right to vote without giving a reason, which to me has left open the possibility of permanent or election specific absentee requests. To me, this means you do not likely need a legislative change.”

“Thanks Amber,” Benson replied, “Looping in Jonathan Brater and Mike Brady from our legal and policy team to explore.”

Brater served as Benson’s legal policy director in 2019, and Brady began working as her chief legal director in February 2019, according to LinkedIn. Benson named Brater director of elections in November 2019.

Benson spokesman Jake Rollow said Benson’s actions conformed to state law.

“Michigan’s voters enshrined the right to vote absentee in our state constitution in 2018, and upon being sworn in to office Secretary Benson went to work implementing the will of the voters,” Rollow said.

Private, Zuckerberg-Connected Group Affects Election Policy

The National Vote At Home Institute focused its 2020 work in Michigan on its top goal of increasing mass mail-in balloting. By January 2020, NVAHI had “hired a lobbyist to quietly push for an administrative fix that would speed up the ballot processing and counting in Michigan,” according to a 2020 presentation obtained through The Federalist’s open records request. NVAHI detailed a five-step plan to push universal absentee ballots, according to meeting material from 2019.

The states that receive one star from NVAHI’s rating system are those that require a valid excuse to vote outside a private booth on election day. States with five stars, its highest rating, had achieved NVAHI’s end goal of “Full Vote at Home.”

NVAHI developed four strategies to push 100 percent mail-in balloting policy in all 50 states, according to 2019 meeting material. The materials say the organization uses the first strategy to eliminate state safeguards on mail-in ballots: “Strategy 1: Reduce the number of Step 1 and Step 2 (excuse required) States to zero. We can achieve this through federal legislation or state by state (legislature or where possible– ballot initiatives),” meeting material reads.

The group’s second strategy is to increase the number of states with a permanent absentee ballot option: “Strategy 2: Increase the number of states that are Step 4 (permanent absentee). So, move current no-excuse states (IL, FL, MN, OH, MI, NM, and others) to Step 4,” the meeting material reads.

NVAHI’s third strategy is to increase the number of mail-in-only states: “Strategy 3: Increase the number of states that are Step 5 (full VAH). CA and UT are in process. We anticipate other states will move in this direction,” say the meeting materials.

The group’s final strategy is to affect how government election offices process absentee ballots: “Strategy 4: Work with states to improve their current procedures with regards to processing mail ballots. This includes a variety of reforms that improve the current process,” meeting material reads.

In 2020, NVAHI’s Circle of Advisors provided an update on the group’s national policy efforts, according to the Federalist-obtained public documents. A map in this update claimed progress in Michigan during 2018/2019 with “no excuse absentee,” but even more was planned for 2020, including “fixes to allow for earlier processing of ballots.”

According to the emails obtained by The Federalist’s records request, McReynolds met with Benson about Michigan elections multiple times in 2019.

“I would like to connect with you about some follow-up items from my visit,” McReynolds wrote in an email on Jan. 26, 2019. “Perhaps a quick chat at some point while you are at NASS [National Association of Secretaries of State].”

After a previous visit, the emails show, McReynolds planned to meet with Benson and several other secretaries of state at the NASS conference in Washington, D.C.

“I wanted to see if we could connect in DC [sic] during NASS,” McReynolds wrote in a Jan. 28, 2019 email. “I was hoping to spend an hour discussing a few topics.”

McReynolds also asked to meet with Benson privately in D.C. to discuss Michigan elections, and Benson agreed, the emails show.

“Perhaps you and I can chat about Michigan specifically on our own,” McReynolds said in an email on Jan. 30, 2019. “Sounds good!” Benson replied.

In February 2019, Benson took advice about absentee ballot applications from both McReynolds and Stephen Silberstein. Silberstein is a left-leaning donor connected with Democracy Alliance and National Popular Vote, according to InfluenceWatch.

“This is very helpful,” Benson said. “We will be implementing many of your suggestions.”

Shortly after their January 2019 meeting in D.C., McReynolds offered Benson and former Secretary of State Kim Wyman (R-Wash.) the position of co-chairs of NVAHI’s new Circle of Advisors, the emails show.

“I am happy to serve,” Benson replied on Feb. 19, 2019. Wyman, however, is not currently listed as a member of the group.

Benson’s Spokesman Denies Private Influence

Rollow claimed McReynolds had “limited and minimal” interactions with McReynolds.

“She was asked to join NVAHI’s circle of advisors, but her direct interactions with McReynolds have been limited and minimal,” Rollow said.

Benson joined Tiana Epps-Johnson, the founder and director of the Zuckerberg-funded Center for Tech and Civic Life, on NVAHI’s Circle of Advisors. In 2020, CTCL funneled approximately half a billion dollars from Zuckerberg to public election agencies in 2020, as The Federalist previously reported.

Partisan Employees Running Public Elections

After officials accepted CTCL grants, NVAHI “grant mentors” sometimes gained access to absentee ballots and edged public officials out of the election process. In Wisconsin, NVAHI’s State Lead Michael-Spitzer Rubenstein—who previously worked for Democrat political campaigns—personally accessed absentee ballots, over Green Bay City Clerk Kris Teske’s objections.

Teske later resigned due to frustration over election intervention by third-party groups like CTCL and NVAHI.

“I don’t know what to do anymore. I am trying to explain the process but it isn’t heard,” Teske said. “I don’t understand how people who don’t have knowledge of the process can tell us how to manage the election.”

The Federalist reached out to McReynolds for comment but did not receive a response.


Logan Washburn is studying politics and journalism at Hillsdale College. He is a correspondent for Campus Reform and an outreach assistant for the Freedom Foundation.

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Lawsuit: Michigan election chief illegally accepted BigTech money to swing 2020 election

Lawsuit: Michigan election chief illegally accepted BigTech money to swing 2020 election

Lawsuit: Michigan election chief Illegally accepted Zuckerberg $ to swing 2020 election

Democrat Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson is focus of lawsuit

By The Center Square Staff

A lawsuit filed against Democrat Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson asserts she illegally accepted private money for the 2020 presidential election to swing the election for President Joe Biden.

The Chicago-based Thomas More Society filed the lawsuit in the Michigan Court of Claims, alleging Benson violated election law by spending private election funding on partisan purposes that denied Michigan voters’ constitutional equal access voting rights.

The Center Square previously reported Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan contributed $400 million nationwide into the 2020 election through their Chicago-based nonprofit, the Center for Technology and Civic Life (CTCL).

The 166-page filing claims that nearly half of CTCL’s funds flowed to Democrat-dominated areas where Biden won. For example, the lawsuit says CTCL made 19 payments exceeding $100,000 all to jurisdictions that Biden carried in 2020.

The lawsuit cites an America Public Media report finding some cities spent little of the money on personal protective equipment (PPE).

The Michigan Legislature aimed to ban private funding of public elections via Senate Bill 303, which Gov. Gretchen Whitmer vetoed in 2021.

Thomas More Society Special Counsel Thor Hearne said that Benson spent CTCL money to boost Democrat-dominated areas in the 2020 election via increased mail-in voting and ballot harvesting.

“The Michigan Constitution guarantees every eligible citizen the right of equal protection when it comes to voting, and that means state officials may not put in place an election scheme that enhances the weight of votes cast by one class of voters or increases one favored class of voters’ access to the ballot,” Hearne said in a statement. “That’s just what happened here. Analysis of data that the Center for Tech and Civic Life provided to the Internal Revenue Service and other public records demonstrates that this scheme was designed to favor urban areas in Michigan and to disadvantage Michigan voters in rural and suburban more politically conservative areas.”

Hearne said the lawsuit aims to set the rules for future elections, not past elections.

“This case is not about relitigating the 2020 election,” Hearne said. “It is about making sure that these unfair and illegal activities cannot happen in any future election in Michigan. As Michigan’s chief election official, Secretary Benson is responsible for ensuring that every eligible Michigan voter has an equal right and opportunity to cast a ballot.”

A CNN report says 11 Republican-led states have prohibited private money from funding public elections.

Thomas More Society attorneys are representing Wisconsin voters in a similar lawsuit.

“The only way Michigan residents can stop a high-tech billionaire from California from directing the conduct of Michigan’s 2022 election is for the Michigan voters and citizens to prevail in this case against Secretary of State Benson,” Thomas More Society President and Chief Counsel Tom Brejcha said in a statement.

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(TLB) published this article with permission of John Solomon at Just the News.  Click Here to read about the staff at Just the News

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Header featured image (edited) credit: Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson/

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Award Winning Democrat Served With A Stack Of Felony Charges

Award Winning Democrat Served With A Stack Of Felony Charges

award

The Democratic Party loves the “unconventional methods” of Michigan party official Sherikia Hawkins so much that they gave her an award. Her methods were so unusual that she was arrested on six felony charges. Hawkins engaged the community in voting by “forging records and falsely marking absentee ballots as invalid” during the 2018 midterm election.

An award for election fraud

Democrat party official Sherikia Hawkins was proud to accept a prize for her valuable service to the Democratic cause. She was honored with the Dingell/Levin Award for using “unconventional methods to engage the community in voting.” As they say on their website, “Sherikia takes pride in using unconventional methods to engage the community in voting.”

Those methods were a little too unconventional. The Detroit News reports that Hawkins was “charged with forging records and falsely marking absentee ballots as invalid.” The 38-year-old Southfield city clerk was arrested recently when the County Clerk in Oakland County noticed something fishy.

There were alarming “discrepancies” in the voter counts from Southfield. When police investigators did some digging, they “found that records had been altered so that nearly 200 voter files were improperly listed as invalid.”

Their Secretary of State is furious. “Our elections are the foundation of our democracy, and under my and Attorney General [Dana] Nessel’s administration there will be no tolerance for any actions that undermine that foundation — anywhere, anytime, by any person or official,” Jocelyn Benson firmly declared in a statement. Even if they do win an award.

Changes made in the computers

The court documents reveal that Michigan police discovered that 193 of the absentee voter files “were changed in the city’s computer system to say they either had no signature or no return date, when they had both valid signatures and return dates.”

When they alerted the Oakland County Election Director about the illegally altered records, Joseph Rozell’s staff “found the original ones in a trashcan at the election division office.” Despite all the evidence, her attorney argues that “it was just a technicality.” He should get an acting award just for saying that with a straight face.

Secretary of State Benson assures the voters that they caught the fraud in time and it didn’t change the election’s outcome. “All valid votes in the election were ultimately counted and the final official vote total was accurate,” she promises.

After the dust settled, Hawkins faces charges of falsifying records in violation of state election law, forgery of a public record, misconduct in office and three counts of using a computer to commit a crime. The most severe of those charges carries a potential penalty of 14 years in prison. For now she’s on the streets, after posting $15,000 bail.

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