Instacart Attacked Georgia’s Voter ID Law But Requires Its Own Shoppers To Provide ID

Two hundred companies signed off on a letter last week to condemn the new Georgia election bill, which notably requires identification for voter absentee ballots. Among the signees was the founder and CEO of food-delivery service Instacart, Apoorva Mehta.

“We believe every American should have a voice in our democracy and that voting should be safe and accessible to all voters,” the statement said. “There are hundreds of bills threatening to make voting more difficult in dozens of states nationwide. We call on elected leaders in every state capitol and in Congress to work across the aisle and ensure that every eligible American has the freedom to easily cast their ballot and participate fully in our democracy.”

While Instacart joined the group of virtue-signaling executives, the company neglects that it mandates all shoppers who deliver groceries to demonstrate photo and facial identification to participate in the gig economy.

According to the company’s website, “the first thing you’ll need to have on-hand” to become an Instacart shopper is “the details of your driver’s license.” Furthermore, applicants must provide their social security number information to get to the next step of inputting their bank information. Additionally, a shopper must undergo a background check that will take up to 10 business days to be cleared to be a contractor. Even after providing this information, a shopper must center their face on the application and be confirmed to shop on a daily or weekly basis.

Nevertheless, Instacart has seemingly taken issue with a bill that both mandates voter ID for absentee ballots and institutes an 11-day deadline for requesting an absentee before election day. Instacart has placed itself on the side that prefers an “election season,” which Democrats have sought.

The hypocrisy here is only worsened by the fact that the company wishes to make shoppers wait up to 10 days to begin working, while implying in its condemnation of the bill that 11 days is far too short for a contractor to have to request an absentee ballot. Why should there be any window, any background check, or any mandate for its employees to prove ID if Instacart takes issue with a bill to do exactly what it is doing (for something far less consequential)?

In truth, one should need to demonstrate ID to both work at Instacart and vote in an election, but these companies are too beholden to left-wing activists, and thus have lost any shred of credibility to comment on the issues of the day.

Instacart did not immediately respond to a request for comment by The Federalist.

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David Hogg Launching Pillow Company So He Can Capture All of the Liberal Tears

Hogg Lindell pillow company TRUMP

Parkland school shooting survivor and gun control advocate David Hogg plans to launch his own pillow company with the goal of competing against embattled bedding company MyPillow. The CEO and founder of MyPillow, Mike Lindell, is a vocal supporter of Donald Trump.

Lefties seek to destroy pillow CEO Mike Lindell

The idea was posed to Hogg, 20, in a tweet from entrepreneur William LeGate on Thursday that questioned whether the duo should start a pillow company to “put MyPillow out of business.”

“Mike the ‘my pillow guy’ … This pillow fight just got very real,” Hogg tweeted on Thursday.

Though it might have initially seemed like a joke, Hogg later said that he was serious about the business venture. He tweeted a list of goals for the future company, which included supporting progressive causes and hiring formerly incarcerated Americans.

“The website will be up in a couple weeks we are very much in the early stages right now,” Hogg said. “But we really are doing this if you have cool name ideas dm me- we think we have one but we are still open.”

Democrats taking cancel culture to extreme

Hogg became a household name in 2018 after a school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, where 17 people were killed. Hogg has since become an outspoken advocate for reforming gun laws and joined several of his classmates in the founding of March for Our Lives, a student-led gun control organization.

LeGate also tweeted about the venture, asking any US-based manufacturers with experience making pillows to reach out to him.

Lindell told NBC News last month that “a group has attacked my vendors” and that retailers called him saying they had been threatened with “a boycott if they don’t comply” and drop his products. Major chains such as Bed Bath & Beyond and Kohl’s dropped MyPillow products amid backlash to Lindell’s outspoken support for President Trump.

The MyPillow Twitter account was suspended after Lindell attempted to use it when his own personal account was banned. Twitter confirmed to NBC news on Monday that the corporate account was removed for a violation of Twitter’s “ban evasion policy.”

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