Kevin McCarthy Restores Integrity To House Intel Committee By Barring Russia Hoaxer Adam Schiff

Republican House Speaker Kevin McCarthy kept his campaign pledge to kick former Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff from the permanent panel after the California Democrat spent years weaponizing the institution.

Last January, McCarthy promised he would strip Schiff from the premier House committee if Republicans reclaimed control of the lower chamber. Schiff’s four-year tenure as chair has been marked by remarkable abuse and grotesque politicization, with Schiff spearheading House Democrats’ impeachment efforts through the Russia hoax and allegations of Ukraine-related corruption.

California Democrat Rep. Eric Swalwell was also kicked from the committee after federal law enforcement found the congressman was likely compromised by a Chinese spy.

“I have rejected the appointments of Adam Schiff and Eric Swalwell for the House Intelligence Committee,” the speaker revealed on Twitter Tuesday night. “I am committed to returning the [House Intelligence Committee] to one of genuine honesty and credibility that regains the trust of the American people.”

As then-House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s right-hand man, Schiff has undermined the credibility of the committee since 2019. The congressman was so useful to Democrats, the former speaker chose him instead of Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler to preside over the first round of impeachment hearings against former President Donald Trump.

Congressional Conman

Schiff earned his favor with Pelosi as a star conman who was eager to leak stories about scandalous Russia collusion to allied media, which were thrilled to run claims that weren’t true. Meanwhile, the California congressman never hesitated to brag about having evidence that would land Trump in jail, which has been the No. 1 priority on the Democrats’ policy agenda since 2016.

[READ: The Case For Booting Adam Schiff From The House Intel Committee]

In March 2017, Schiff said on MSNBC that “there is more than circumstantial evidence” that Trump’s campaign colluded with Moscow to capture the presidential election. Schiff would then be disappointed two years later when the Democrats’ special counsel investigation on the subject found that the White House occupant had not been a covert Russian operative.

The congressman’s reaction — to what should have been good news for anyone genuinely concerned about Russian espionage in the form of a presidential double agent — was defiance. Schiff just shook his fist on Capitol Hill and said more would come out.

“In the coming weeks and months, new information will continue to be exposed through enterprising journalism, indictments by the Special Counsel, or continued investigative work by Committee Democrats and our counterparts in the Senate,” he said in a press release. “And each time this new information becomes public, Republicans will be held accountable for abandoning a critical investigation of such vital national importance.”

Of course, Schiff knew efforts to unmask Trump as a Kremlin plant were fraudulent investigations anyway. A 2109 report from the DOJ inspector general exposed how Schiff had been lying about the Russiagate conspiracy since the inception of the hoax.

Pelosi’s Intelligence Committee chairman went on to employ the same playbook for the Democrats’ witch hunt operations surrounding allegations of an illegal quid pro quo with the Ukrainian government and the Capitol riot on Jan. 6, 2021.

McCarthy’s Pledge

As House Republican minority leader last year, McCarthy had been clear he would kick a trio of Democrat lawmakers from committees if he were eventually elected speaker. The move would follow the Democratic majority taking the unprecedented step of dictating Republican appointments in the last Congress. Georgia GOP Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene was stripped of her assignments within a month of her swearing-in, and Pelosi barred Republican appointments to the Select Committee on Jan. 6. Pelosi’s refusal to greenlight McCarthy’s picks for the panel marked the first time in House history that minority appointments were barred.

McCarthy said Schiff and Swalwell were to be removed from the Intelligence Committee, and Minnesota Rep. Ilhan Omar would be taken off the Foreign Affairs Committee.

The new Republican House speaker defended his decision to follow through with plans for removal on Capitol Hill Tuesday night.

“What did Adam Schiff do as chairman of the Intel Committee?” McCarthy asked a reporter who was shouting questions. “What Adam Schiff did [was] use his power as the chairman and lied to the American public. Even the inspector general said it.”

McCarthy went on to list a litany of lies Schiff told the public while leading the legislature’s most secretive committee. The speaker chastised Schiff for smearing Republican counterparts on the Intelligence Committee as Russian propagandists and seeking to discredit the Hunter Biden laptop.

“When Devin Nunes put out a memo, [Schiff] said it was false. When we had a laptop, he used it before an election to be politics and say that it was false and say it was the Russians,” McCarthy said. “[Schiff] used his position as chairman, knowing he has information the rest of America does not, and lied to the American public.”

McCarthy made clear no Democrat lawmakers would be denied proper seats on committees to represent their constituents, but added that none of the three lawmakers whom he reassigned would serve in roles related to national security.

“They’ll serve on committees, but they will not serve on a place that has national security relevance because integrity matters to me,” McCarthy said.

The Republican House speaker restored committee assignments to Greene and Arizona Rep. Paul Gosar last week.


Tristan Justice is the western correspondent for The Federalist. He has also written for The Washington Examiner and The Daily Signal. His work has also been featured in Real Clear Politics and Fox News. Tristan graduated from George Washington University where he majored in political science and minored in journalism. Follow him on Twitter at @JusticeTristan or contact him at Tristan@thefederalist.com.

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Washington Could Use More Fistfights

Washington Could Use More Fistfights

Amid the productive House speaker deliberations this weekend came a bizarre altercation between Matt Gaetz and Mike Rogers, a couple of Republican congressmen on opposites sides of the McCarthy squabble.

A C-SPAN peek at the House floor showed a frustrated Kevin McCarthy approaching Gaetz after the Florida representative had sunk McCarthy’s 14th attempt at securing the speaker’s gavel. But it was only when McCarthy walked away that his heated ally Rogers made a move toward Gaetz and was physically restrained, complete with a hand to the face.

Here’s the full “Fight Night” clip, if you missed it:

As of Monday, McCarthy is officially speaker, Rogers and Gaetz appear to have “hugged it out,” so to speak — and, surprise, surprise, the media are aghast at the “complete meltdown.” Depending on which outlet you consult, it was a “wild lunge,” a “dumpster fire,” a “literal floor fight,” and “the defining image of the new Congress” (it was none of these things).

But if brawls on the House floor were the status quo of the new Congress, would that be so bad? Frankly, the whole kerfuffle was kind of pathetic and undoubtedly overblown; Rogers didn’t “lunge” at or “attack” Gaetz so much as take a halfhearted step toward him and get theatrically pulled away. But one could argue Washington would actually be a much better place with more fistfights.

We live in quite a confused world when it comes to masculinity, strength, and conflict. Men are excoriated for their manliness and brute impulses and are then left on their own to seek out the Jordan Petersons in a world of Liver Kings and Andrew Tates. The same armchair class that spends its days hyperventilating about the loss of norms and decorum is the first to undermine them. And the biggest drama queens about Trumpian crassness are the sickos at the Lincoln Project and Human Rights Campaign.

Bonchie at RedState made what should be an obvious point, but is nonetheless a good one, that it would be nice to see this kind of Republican fire directed at far-left opponents, not just each other, every once in a while. “When is the last time you saw a member of the GOP get that animated over yet another omnibus bill being forced down their throats? Or at watching a gun control bill pass against their will? Or at seeing a Democrat Speaker of the House strip their colleagues of committee assignments while ignoring bad behavior from the left?” Bonchie wrote.

But more than just a little prudence about where to direct their fire, perhaps the men in Congress would have better luck getting things done if they dislodged their thumbs from their arses and threw some hands. I’m exaggerating a bit, but not much.

There’s something refreshing and healthy about the way men fight: If a frank exchange of words doesn’t do the trick, a quick hook to the jaw gets the message across and the job done. But it’s not only that; men who fight well respect men who fight well. Unlike bully-in-the-schoolyard tropes, when clashing men who respect each other put up their dukes and fight out their differences, mature ones have a way of dusting themselves off, shaking hands (literally or figuratively), and walking away with the chips once on their shoulders left behind somewhere in the dirt. This was precisely what happened after Gaetz and Roger butted heads.

One could argue that fistfighting isn’t very Christ-like. But there’s certainly a biblical case to be made for corporal punishment, to the point that when Jesus saw greedy businessmen scheming to make a quick buck by exploiting the holy temple, He aggressively overthrew their table and drove them out with whips.

Of course, we aren’t talking about punishment here. But reasonable people can make a case for striking somebody in certain scenarios, like if a thief is attempting to pick your pocket, a jerk says something unsavory about your wife, or someone tries to take advantage of your child. Now imagine that pickpocket is a lawmaker cleaning out the pocketbooks of unwitting taxpayers, that jerk is some opponent smearing the good men and women you represent as “deplorables,” and that someone is a co-worker beholden to the mutilative transgender lobby.

Morally and philosophically, I reject physical violence, but I can’t help but notice that of all the ways sinful people manage their intense disagreements, men getting into a fight and then quickly making amends has got to be one of the best out there. Not only does it head off more intense evils and uncontrolled violence, but it also teaches kids, especially boys, that there are worse things than getting popped in the mouth. Being afraid of bullies is no way to develop the kind of desirable masculinity that welcomes a fight if it’s necessary to defend the weak.

Instead, men in Washington tend to do something far worse than fight — and that’s do nothing at all. Like women of low moral character, they avoid conflict to the point of resentment, gossip, and endless tiffs. And like spineless men, they shirk away from their responsibilities to fight for what’s right, thus sacrificing those weaker than they to blood-lusting opponents.

It’s easy to pat yourself on the back for decorum, principles, and “turning the other cheek” while you let tyrants muzzle toddlers and fire unvaccinated employees, butchers carve up confused kids, ideologues disincentivize fatherhood, and bureaucrats ship poor workers’ money to a corrupt regime overseas. If that’s what conflict avoidance looks like, there’s nothing defensible about it.

And in the swamp, that’s exactly what it looks like. Maybe Gaetz and Rogers were on to something.


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Congress Must Abandon Its Haphazard Status Quo Of Budgeting By Crisis 

Congress Must Abandon Its Haphazard Status Quo Of Budgeting By Crisis 

The Dec. 16 expiration of government funding must have been an accident. It would take foresight and purposeful planning to schedule a budget deadline for the anniversary of the Boston Tea Party. Sadly, the 117th Congress has shown neither quality. The descendants of these American patriots are now at the mercy of a lame-duck Congress, rather than a foreign monarch. The narrowly divided legislature that emerged from the midterms, however, presents an opportunity to enact a single-bill budget process, eliminate governance by crisis, and improve America’s fiscal health.

Congressional leaders’ reliance on shutdown brinkmanship instead of a transparent and inclusive budget process has contributed to low trust in Congress by the American people. It is easy to see why. 

Writing a real, substantive budget would improve accountability to the people and requires legislators to develop and debate priorities. The current practice of shutdown leverage for continuing resolutions and omnibus appropriations has produced closed-door, leader-driven spending bills that most members have little time to review and no chance to amend. 

These appropriations bills only cover about 30 percent of all spending, however, and their separation from direct spending and revenue prevents effective budget management. This process perpetuates budget hostage situations and apocalyptic talk of shutdowns.

The results of such a short-sighted approach to budgeting are evident. The current administration has approved $5 trillion in new borrowing in the past two years. The lame-duck Congress could grow the debt further through an omnibus package limited only by the appetites of the negotiators, who are just a handful of Congress’s 535 members.

This budget brinksmanship comes even as legislators reckon with the consequences of spending policies shaped by crises wrought by mismanagement. Government investigators now estimate that up to $100 billion in Paycheck Protection Program loans were fraudulent. Legislators could at least blame opportunistic bad actors for taking advantage of a public health crisis, but that does not relieve them of the responsibility to learn from such costly mistakes.

Congress must begin to restore fiscal health and budgetary accountability, however. Members ought to first reject attempts by the executive branch to extend Covid-19 pandemic emergency measures. The pandemic is over, except for those seeking to leverage it for further giveaways.

Reining in the abuse of executive branch emergency measures is the obvious part. Our elected representatives should follow suit by demanding effective budgeting in Congress as well. That means reviving committee and member-driven deliberation about the federal government’s funding priorities.

An effective budget means one bill each year that includes all spending and all revenue. Such a unified budget is familiar to anyone who has balanced a checkbook or run a private organization.

Congress’s complicated, fragmented, and dysfunctional budget system would deliver better results through a simpler, comprehensive budget. A better process would respect committee jurisdictions and draw from the collective institutional and subject-level knowledge that these members possess. Committee members are most aware of the challenges, opportunities, and priorities within the agencies they oversee.

Already 14 states, including Indiana, Florida, and North Carolina, do a single budget bill per budget cycle (annual or biennial). It is no coincidence that these states enjoy better fiscal health than those that use a piecemeal approach to budgeting and appropriations, such as Oregon and Mississippi. 

It’s too late to avoid yet another continuing resolution or omnibus appropriations act, but this should be the last time Congress uses such a broken process. A narrowly divided Congress is an opportunity to fix the system so legislators can once again provide the best value to the American people. 

In addition to a real budget, Congress should use the debt limit to strike a broad, bipartisan deal to replace crisis-driven budgeting with better incentives to get the fiscal work done well and on time. Congress could, for example, suspend the debt limit as long as the budget meets reasonable fiscal targets. As it stands, the main benchmark is avoiding a shutdown, but a better system would help legislators build on previous gains toward solvency and effective stewardship. Such compromises would not only start to restore the trust needed for bipartisan negotiations but also promote confidence among investors, creditors, and constituents. 

The Boston Tea Party caused a crisis in British colonial rule that led to a great experiment in American self-governance. America will mark the 249th anniversary of history’s most consequential political protest with yet another top-down, government-by-crisis budget deadline. 

This cannot continue without end. Members of Congress ought to prepare now to move past such short-sighted thinking and restore public trust and accountability to the budget process.


Kurt Couchman is a senior fellow in fiscal policy for Americans for Prosperity. He develops and supports innovative solutions to federal and state budget challenges while promoting fiscal outcomes that expand freedom, prosperity, and opportunity.

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Garland Moves To Transform J6 Inquisition Into A Permanent Prosecution

Garland Moves To Transform J6 Inquisition Into A Permanent Prosecution

Attorney General Merrick Garland launched a special counsel investigation into former President Donald Trump on Friday, the week before Thanksgiving, to ensure a permanent prosecution of public enemy number one on a third bid for the White House.

The special counsel, Garland said, will take over the investigation of Trump’s purported mishandling of presidential records and probe whether Trump can be held criminally liable for the events that unfolded on Jan. 6, 2021. The former is a desperate follow-up to the latter after the House Select Committee on Jan. 6 emerged empty-handed from an 18-month investigation.

“It is in the public interest to appoint a special prosecutor to independently manage an investigation and prosecution based on recent developments, including [Trump’s] announcement that he is a candidate for president in the next election and the sitting president’s stated intention to be a candidate as well,” Garland told reporters at an afternoon press conference.

Trump officially declared his candidacy to reclaim the Republican Party’s presidential nomination this past Tuesday. Just as his administration was handicapped early on by a special counsel investigation probing left-wing conspiracies of Russian collusion, his third presidential campaign has already been hit with the same playbook.

The timeline of Garland’s announcement three days after Trump’s announcement was surely a political calculation. As the Soviet-style Jan. 6 inquisition began to wind down on Capitol Hill with nothing to show this summer, Garland personally signed off on an unprecedented raid of a former president. Garland sent more than 30 plain clothes FBI agents to search Trump’s Florida residence at Mar-a-Lago over apparent violations of the Presidential Records Act, a rarely prosecuted statute now being weaponized to prosecute political opponents. The entire investigation was set in motion by a disgruntled bureaucrat at the National Archives and Records Administration. The Justice Department alleged that Trump illegally took classified documents with him to Florida after he left the White House last year.

All Americans want — and deserve — is an attorney general who cares about the law. Garland, however, is far from it. Look no further than his refusal to appoint a special prosecutor on Hunter Biden, whose father, serving as president, presents a legitimate conflict of interest worthy of an independent probe. Garland is a political activist with an axe to grind after his 2016 Supreme Court nomination was thwarted by the man he’s now pledged to prosecute to the ends of the Earth.

The appointment of a second special counsel to sic on Trump is the natural response of a Democrat to the ex-president’s pursuit of a second term. The Russia hoax failed. The impeachment over a fabricated scandal in Ukraine failed. Prosecution over the Emoluments Clause failed, and the Jan. 6 Committee failed to serve the long-sought indictment that’s become the top item on the Democrats’ policy agenda for six years. Now that the Select Committee’s days are numbered with an incoming Republican majority, Garland’s move to bring a special counsel into the mix is a move to cement the Jan. 6 inquiry into a forever investigation. But while the panel admitted their investigation was all about last week’s midterms in March, Garland is pretending his department’s politized investigations are all about public integrity.

“Such an appointment underscores the Department’s commitment to both independence and accountability in particularly sensitive matters,” Garland said Friday. “It also allows prosecutors and agents to continue their work expeditiously and to make decisions indisputably guided only by the facts and the law.”

Had Garland appointed a special counsel to investigate Hunter Biden, the attorney general might have a leg to stand on. Instead, the nation’s chief law enforcement official has spent the last two years covering for the incumbent Democratic president while dispatching agents on political enemies, including parents concerned over inappropriate content presented in their children’s classrooms.


Tristan Justice is the western correspondent for The Federalist. He has also written for The Washington Examiner and The Daily Signal. His work has also been featured in Real Clear Politics and Fox News. Tristan graduated from George Washington University where he majored in political science and minored in journalism. Follow him on Twitter at @JusticeTristan or contact him at Tristan@thefederalist.com.

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Garland Moves To Transform J6 Inquisition Into A Permanent Prosecution

Attorney General Merrick Garland launched a special counsel investigation into former President Donald Trump on Friday, the week before Thanksgiving, to ensure a permanent prosecution of public enemy number one on a third bid for the White House.

The special counsel, Garland said, will take over the investigation of Trump’s purported mishandling of presidential records and probe whether Trump can be held criminally liable for the events that unfolded on Jan. 6, 2021. The former is a desperate follow-up to the latter after the House Select Committee on Jan. 6 emerged empty-handed from an 18-month investigation.

“It is in the public interest to appoint a special prosecutor to independently manage an investigation and prosecution based on recent developments, including [Trump’s] announcement that he is a candidate for president in the next election and the sitting president’s stated intention to be a candidate as well,” Garland told reporters at an afternoon press conference.

Trump officially declared his candidacy to reclaim the Republican Party’s presidential nomination this past Tuesday. Just as his administration was handicapped early on by a special counsel investigation probing left-wing conspiracies of Russian collusion, his third presidential campaign has already been hit with the same playbook.

The timeline of Garland’s announcement three days after Trump’s announcement was surely a political calculation. As the Soviet-style Jan. 6 inquisition began to wind down on Capitol Hill with nothing to show this summer, Garland personally signed off on an unprecedented raid of a former president. Garland sent more than 30 plain clothes FBI agents to search Trump’s Florida residence at Mar-a-Lago over apparent violations of the Presidential Records Act, a rarely prosecuted statute now being weaponized to prosecute political opponents. The entire investigation was set in motion by a disgruntled bureaucrat at the National Archives and Records Administration. The Justice Department alleged that Trump illegally took classified documents with him to Florida after he left the White House last year.

All Americans want — and deserve — is an attorney general who cares about the law. Garland, however, is far from it. Look no further than his refusal to appoint a special prosecutor on Hunter Biden, whose father, serving as president, presents a legitimate conflict of interest worthy of an independent probe. Garland is a political activist with an axe to grind after his 2016 Supreme Court nomination was thwarted by the man he’s now pledged to prosecute to the ends of the Earth.

The appointment of a second special counsel to sic on Trump is the natural response of a Democrat to the ex-president’s pursuit of a second term. The Russia hoax failed. The impeachment over a fabricated scandal in Ukraine failed. Prosecution over the Emoluments Clause failed, and the Jan. 6 Committee failed to serve the long-sought indictment that’s become the top item on the Democrats’ policy agenda for six years. Now that the Select Committee’s days are numbered with an incoming Republican majority, Garland’s move to bring a special counsel into the mix is a move to cement the Jan. 6 inquiry into a forever investigation. But while the panel admitted their investigation was all about last week’s midterms in March, Garland is pretending his department’s politized investigations are all about public integrity.

“Such an appointment underscores the Department’s commitment to both independence and accountability in particularly sensitive matters,” Garland said Friday. “It also allows prosecutors and agents to continue their work expeditiously and to make decisions indisputably guided only by the facts and the law.”

Had Garland appointed a special counsel to investigate Hunter Biden, the attorney general might have a leg to stand on. Instead, the nation’s chief law enforcement official has spent the last two years covering for the incumbent Democratic president while dispatching agents on political enemies, including parents concerned over inappropriate content presented in their children’s classrooms.


Tristan Justice is the western correspondent for The Federalist. He has also written for The Washington Examiner and The Daily Signal. His work has also been featured in Real Clear Politics and Fox News. Tristan graduated from George Washington University where he majored in political science and minored in journalism. Follow him on Twitter at @JusticeTristan or contact him at Tristan@thefederalist.com.

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Democrats Slip Capitol Hill Jobs Plan for Illegal Aliens into Funding Package

Democrats Slip Capitol Hill Jobs Plan for Illegal Aliens into Funding Package

Democrats on the House Appropriations Committee have slipped a Capitol Hill jobs plan for illegal aliens enrolled in former President Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program into a government funding package.

As part of their legislative funding package for the 2023 fiscal year, House Democrats are hoping to reward DACA illegal aliens by allowing them to take jobs in Washington, DC, on Capitol Hill.

The move would be expansive, as it would likely place DACA illegal aliens in the offices of Democrats in the House and Senate.

The language of the provision reads:

House Appropriations Committee

For years, Democrats have sought to ensure that DACA illegal aliens can take coveted Capitol Hill jobs. Last year, for instance, they advanced a similar plan through the House, but it ultimately stalled.

As Breitbart News reported, from 2012 to 2018, more than 53,000 illegal aliens were awarded DACA status despite having prior arrest records, including for crimes like murder, kidnapping, rape, child pornography, and sex crimes.

Currently, the nation’s largest multinational corporations — represented by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce — are lobbying Washington, DC, lawmakers to give amnesty to millions of illegal aliens enrolled and eligible for DACA.

John Binder is a reporter for Breitbart News. Email him at jbinder@breitbart.com. Follow him on Twitter here

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Joe Biden Again Falsely Claims Trump Supporters Killed Police Officers on January 6

President Joe Biden falsely claimed Saturday that supporters of former President Donald Trump killed police officers during the January 6th riots on Capitol Hill.

The president spoke about the January 6th protests during his commencement speech at the University of Delaware.

He said:

A mob of insurrectionists stormed the Capitol, the very citadel of democracy. Imagine what you’d be thinking today if you had heard this morning before you got here that a group of a thousand people broke down the doors of the parliament of Great Britain, killed two police officers, smashed and ransacked the office of members of the British Parliament or any other, what would you think? What would you think?

Biden has previously made the false claim about Trump supporters killing police officers.

U.S. Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick died a day after the attack, but his death was afterward determined to be from natural causes: two strokes at the base of his brain stem caused by a clot in an artery.

Four police officers, serving either the Capitol Police or the Washington Metropolitan Police force, died by suicide in the weeks following the attacks.

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Jim Jordan Demands Answers For FBI Retaliation Of Employees Who Peacefully Protested On J6

Jim Jordan Demands Answers For FBI Retaliation Of Employees Who Peacefully Protested On J6

Ohio Republican Rep. Jim Jordan is demanding an FBI briefing for members of Congress after a whistleblower report alleged agency retaliation against those who attended peaceful protests on Jan. 6, 2021.

“We have been alerted that the Federal Bureau of Investigation appears to be attempting to
terminate the employment of FBI employees who were engaged in protected First Amendment
activity on January 6, 2021,” Jordan wrote in a Friday letter to FBI Director Christopher Wray. “According to several whistleblowers, the FBI is suspending the security clearances of
FBI employees for their participation in protected First Amendment activity on January 6, 2021.”

Revocation of security clearances often signals the first step in employment termination as those clearances are required for agency personnel. On Wednesday, Jordan’s office received notice that the Department of Justice had opened a probe into whether the law enforcement agency is violating civil service laws by its conduct.

One employee, whose identity has been redacted, faces agency expulsion after three decades of service — 20 in the military and 10 with the FBI. The targeted individual is allegedly among several who attended public events in the capital with their spouses while on leave. Attendance at any and all events on Jan. 6, however, have become criminalized by House Democrats in collusion with the Biden administration, who have conflated peaceful White House demonstrations with the violence on Capitol Hill.

In October, President Joe Biden’s FBI blocked requests from Republican lawmakers to review the same material offered to Democrats related to the Capitol riot. The same agency began to target concerned parents who showed up at school board meetings to raise objections to extreme Covid-19 protocols and sexually explicit material in the classroom with domestic terrorism tags.

“Given these facts, it is extremely concerning that the FBI would seek to suspend the
security clearances of these employees and begin the process to potentially terminate their
employment altogether,” Jordan wrote on Friday. “Even more insulting is that the FBI would openly question the patriotism of long-time FBI employees, including at least one veteran, because they exercised their First Amendment rights on their personal time without breaking any laws.”

Jordan demanded that Wray offer lawmakers a full briefing on the issue by May 20.


Tristan Justice is the western correspondent for The Federalist. He has also written for The Washington Examiner and The Daily Signal. His work has also been featured in Real Clear Politics and Fox News. Tristan graduated from George Washington University where he majored in political science and minored in journalism. Follow him on Twitter at @JusticeTristan or contact him at Tristan@thefederalist.com.

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